Major Cities:

  • Hong Kong
  • Macau
  • Taiwan

Demographics:

  • Hong Kong Population: 7.188 million
  • Macau Population: 566,375 thousand
  • Taiwan Population: 23.34 million

Business Assistance:

AustCham Hong Kong and Macau
Room 301-2, Floor 3, Lucky Building
39 Wellington St, Central Hong Kong
Tel: +852 2522 5054
Email: austcham@austcham.com.hk
Website: www.austcham.com.hk
Austrade Hong Kong and Macau
24 Floor Harbour Centre
25 Harbour Road Wanchai
Hong Kong
Tel: +852 2588 5300
Fax: +852 2827 4145
Email: hongkong@austrade.gov.au
Australian Consulate General
23 Floor Harbour Centre
25 Harbour Road, Wanchai, Hong Kong
Tel: +852 2827 8881
Fax: +852 2585 4457
Website: www.hongkong.china.embassy.gov.au

History:

  • Hong Kong
    Hong Kong as we know it today was born when China’s Qing dynasty government was defeated in the First Opium War in 1842, when it ceded Hong Kong Island to Britain. Within 60 years, Kowloon, the New Territories and 235 Outlying Islands were also leased to Britain.
    From its earliest days as a British colony, Hong Kong served as a centre of international trade. In the turbulent years of the early 20th century, the city’s population was bolstered by refugees, mostly from China. The arrival of immigrants in large numbers helped launch a new role for Hong Kong as a major manufacturing hub. It also brought economically stimulating energy and industry to the city’s character. In recent decades, as the economy of Mainland China has undergone a process of opening up, Hong Kong has transformed yet again – this time into a service-based economy as well as an important gateway to the world’s largest market.
    Under the principle of ‘One Country, Two Systems’, Hong Kong became a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China on 1 July 1997.
  • Macau
    Fishermen from Fujian and farmers from Guangdong were the first known settlers in Macau, when it was known as Ou Mun, or “the trading gate”, because of its location at the mouth of the Pearl River downstream from Guangzhou (Canton). During ancient times the port city was part of the Silk Road with ships loading there with silk for Rome. In the early 1550s the Portuguese reached Ou Mun, which the locals also called A Ma Gao, “place of A Ma”, in honour of the Goddess of Seafarers, whose temple stood at the entrance to the sheltered Inner Harbour. The Portuguese adopted the name, which gradually changed into the name Macau, and with the permission of Guangdong’s mandarins, established a city that within a short time had become a major entrepot for trade between China, Japan, India and Europe. Following the Opium War in 1841, Hong Kong was established by Britain and most of the foreign merchants left Macau, which became a quaint, quiet backwater. Today Macau is a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China, and, like Hong Kong, benefits from the principle of “one country, two systems”.
  • Taiwan
    In the first half of the 17th Century, the Dutch established a presence at Anping (in modern-day Tainan city). They conducted missionary activities, trade and the production of various goods. They also recruited many Han Chinese immigrants from the China coast, leading to a multicultural history of Taiwan. In the late 19th Century, the wave of imperialism touched the shores of Taiwan. The island became a colony of Japan and remained under Japanese rule for 50 years, during which time it evolved from a traditional society into a modern society. At the end of World War II in 1945, Taiwan was liberated from colonial rule. Since then, the island has experienced an economic miracle and introduced political democracy. Today, Taiwan officially known as the Republic of China is a sovereign state in East Asia.

Industries:

  • Hong Kong
    The traditional Four Key Industries in Hong Kong, including financial services, trading and logistics, tourism, and professional and producer services, have been the driving force of Hong Kong’s economic growth, providing impetus to growth of other sectors and creating employment.
  • Macau
    The two main industries in Macau are manufacturing and services. Macau has a well-established manufacturing sector that plays an important economic role. Manufacturing contributes 40 percent of the GDP, providing employment to over 90 000 people. Macau’s services sector includes tourism, gambling, financial services and retail. Tourism is the most important sector of Macau economy, providing direct employment (such as in hotels and restaurants) for 28 percent of the labour force.
  • Taiwan
    The major industries in Taiwan are electronics, petroleum refining, armaments, chemicals, textiles, iron and steel, machinery, cement, food processing, vehicles, consumer products, pharmaceuticals.

Local Dishes:

  • Hong Kong
    Wonton Mian or wonton noodles is a Cantonese dish particularly popular in Hong Kong. The dish is usually served in a hot broth, garnished with leafy vegetables and wonton dumplings. Wontons in Hong Kong are usually prawn. There are however, plenty of variations of this dish, with different toppings and garnishes. For example, the soup and wontons can be served in separate bowls, the noodles being served relatively dry with the toppings and garnishes, dressed with sauce and dipping the noodles into the soup to eat them.
  • Taiwan
    Danzaimian or danzai noodles are one of the best-known snacks in Taiwan. Like many dishes in Taiwan, this dish incorporates both meat and seafood. The broth is often infused with the flavour of the sea by simmering shrimp heads and shells in a basic pork stock. This broth as well as a long-simmered pork meat sauce is served with the noodles, which are usually slightly think and chewy. Before serving the soup is given a kick of acidity from a dash of black vinegar splashed into the bowl.